Financials

During FY05, the Maine Humanities Council had operating income of $1,946,442 and operating expenses of $1,848,147. The Council has never incurred an operating deficit.

Over the past decade the Council’s income sources have become increasingly diversified. As recently as 1995, nearly all of its resources came from the National Endowment for the Humanities, a federal agency. While grants from the NEH still comprise about one-third of the Council’s budget, this support has been supplemented by a diverse range of other income streams, from the individual contributions highlighted elsewhere in this report, to program income, and support from private foundations. Both the income and expense figures reported here include in-kind contributions of time, mileage and materials valued at $276,692.

graphic of finances

Grant and Program Activity

Grant and Program Activity

 

“As I do interviews and conduct research for the audio tour, I keep asking myself, ‘Who knew?’ The scope and diversity of life and culture along the corridor is, well, kind of mind-boggling.”
—Rob Rosenthal, Audio Producer, Shunpike Audio, talking about the Kennebec-Chaudière International Corridor’s audio tour
In 2005: 110 Maine Humanities Council grants were awarded to organizations and groups in 63 towns, reaching thousands of Mainers statewide.
Skowhegan Indian by Bernard Langlais

The Skowhegan Indian by Bernard Langlais (1921-1977), a Kennebec-Chaudière corridor landmark, dedicated in 1969.

photo courtesy
margaret chase smith library
Abbe Levin, project director of the Kennebec-Chaudière Audio Tour project, with Victoria Bonebakker, Associate Director, MHC.

Abbe Levin, project director of the Kennebec-Chaudière Audio Tour project, with Victoria Bonebakker, Associate Director, MHC.

photo: erik c. jordensen