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After Shock

Plenary Speakers & Workshop Presenters (as of November 4, 2010)

Catherine Belling

Catherine Belling, PhDAssistant Professor in the Program in Medical Humanities and Bioethics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Her work focuses on anxiety, narrative, and representation in health care. Workshop: Graphic Witness: Comics, Drawing and Trauma

Catherine Belling is an assistant professor in the Program in Medical Humanities and Bioethics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Her PhD is in English literature (Stony Brook University, New York) and she has an art school background (Rhodes University, South Africa), but her focus now is on anxiety, narrative, and representation in health care. She is presently finishing a book with the working title Reading Hypochondria, and has published in journals such as Academic Medicine, Narrative, and Perspectives in Biology and Medicine. She serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Medical Humanities and Literature and Medicine, and on the board of directors of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities.

 
Helen Benedict

Helen Benedict, PhDProfessor of Journalism at Columbia University, author of The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving in Iraq Workshop: “You’ve Gotta Be Twice as Bad as the Boys:” The Uses of Narrative to Explore the Experiences and Needs of Women Veterans

Helen Benedict, a professor of journalism at Columbia University, is the author of five novels and five nonfiction books. Her latest are The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving in Iraq, which won the 2010 Ken Book Award from NAMI, and the novel, The Edge of Eden, which came out at the end of 2009. Both books are available in paperback. Benedict won the 2008 James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism for her work on women soldiers, and her play, The Lonely Soldier Monologues, was performed at two New York theaters several times in 2008 and 2009. This spring, her new novel, Sand Queen, about a female soldier and an Iraqi woman in the Iraq War will be published by Soho Press.

 
Kate Braestrup

Kate BraestrupCommunity minister, law enforcement chaplain, and the author of Here If You Need Me and Marriage and Other Acts of Charity Speaking: Saturday morning

Kate Braestrup is a Unitarian-Universalist chaplain to the Maine Warden Service, joining the wardens as they search the wild lands and fresh waters of Maine for those who have lost their way, and offering comfort to those who wait for the ones they love to be rescued, or for their bodies to be recovered. Her New York Times bestselling memoir, Here If You Need Me, won the Barnes and Noble Discover Award for nonfiction. Her magazine articles have appeared in The New York Times, the Boston Globe, and O, The Oprah Magazine.

Listen to Kate Braetrup’s interview on PBS’s “Life (Part 2)” and visit her website for more about her.

 
Susan Brison

Susan Brison, PhDAssociate Professor of Philosophy at Dartmouth College and the author of Aftermath: Violence and the Remaking of a Self Workshop: Violence and the Remaking of a Self: A Philosophical Perspective on Trauma and Narrative

Susan J. Brison is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Dartmouth College and the author of Aftermath: Violence and the Remaking of a Self (2002), a philosophical examination of trauma incorporating a first person narrative of her experience surviving a near-fatal rape and attempted murder. She is co-editor of Contemporary Perspectives on Constitutional Interpretation (1993) and author of numerous scholarly articles on sexual violence and on free speech as well as articles in the Sunday New York Times Magazine, The Guardian, The Chronicle Review, and other newspapers and magazines. She has been active in the anti-rape movement since 1991.

 
Suzanne Brown

Suzanne Brown, PhD Literature & Medicine Program Scholar; Visiting Assistant Professor, Dartmouth College Pre-conference training (Thursday): How to Start a Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health Care® Program at your Institution Workshop: “Who Am I?” The Essence of Identity After Traumatic Brain Injury

Suzanne Brown is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor at Dartmouth College, where she has taught since 1980. Her courses there have included Humanities, Contemporary American Literature, Women’s Studies, Critical Theory, and Creative Writing. Suzanne’s short stories and critical articles have appeared in such publications as The Southern Review, The Yale Review, Virginia Quarterly, and Modern Fiction Studies. She spent a year in Germany as a Fulbright Scholar and was awarded an Individual Artist Fellowship from the New Hampshire Arts Council and residencies at Yaddo, MacDowell and Ragdale artist colonies. She holds a doctorate in English literature from the University of Pennsylvania. Suzanne attended the first Literature & Medicine workshop in Maine almost eight years ago and has been facilitating discussions in hospitals ever since. This year she is working with five hospitals, including leading a fourth year of discussions at the VA hospital in White River Junction, Vermont, and is the editor for Echoes of War, a new anthology of readings published by the Maine Humanities Council for the Literature & Medicine program. She lives with her husband in Etna, New Hampshire.

 
Victoria Bonebakker

Victoria Bonebakker Associate Director for the Maine Humanities Council Pre-conference training: How to Start a Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health Care® Program at your Institution Training: Thursday

Victoria Bonebakker has been the Associate Director of the Maine Humanities Council since 1997. She created Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health CareŽ that year, and since then has overseen its expansion into 26 states and the creation of two Literature & Medicine anthologies. In previous incarnations she taught elementary school French in Washington D.C. and San Francisco, practiced law in San Francisco and Los Angeles, and taught law at UCLA Law School.

Read Victoria Bonebakker’s article about the Literature & Medicine program published in Hektoen International, A Journal of Medical Humanities.

 
Celeste Campbell

Celeste Campbell, Psy.D. Neuropsychologist serving in the Polytrauma Program at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Washington, DC Workshop: “Who Am I?” The Essence of Identity After Traumatic Brain Injury

Dr. Celeste Campbell is a Neuropsychologist serving in the Polytrauma Program at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Washington, DC. She received her undergraduate education at Yale University, holds a doctoral degree from Drexel University, and has completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Rehabilitation Neuropsychology at National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington, DC. She is licensed in Virginia. Dr. Campbell has a long history of providing cognitive psychotherapy and developing residential behavioral management programs for children and adults with a variety of cognitive deficits, including learning disability, developmental disability and traumatic brain injury. Dr. Campbell has served as adjunct faculty for the George Washington University Graduate Certificate Program in Special Education and Traumatic Brain Injury. In addition she has been a frequent presenter and workshop facilitator, addressing psychological, neuropsychological and cognitive issues following brain injury to survivors and their families and friends, rehabilitation and vocational specialists, special education teachers, and case managers. Dr. Campbell currently serves on the District of Columbia Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Advisory Board and the Ohio Valley Center Model Systems Advisory Council. She has previously served on the boards of the Northern Virginia Brain Injury Association, the Brain Injury Association of Virginia, and the MidAtlantic Traumatic Brain Injury Consortium. She has appeared on “The Donahue Show,” “Taking the ‘Dis’ out of Disability”, and PBS’ “Exploring the Brain with Garrick Utley.”

When not practicing psychology, Dr. Campbell might be found on the stage of a local community theater. Or she might be in Hawaii.

 

Sam Console, 1LT Pennsylvania National Guard (Inactive) Workshop: Veterans’ Stories: Trauma and the Experience of War

Sam Console served in Iraq as an Engineer Platoon Leader and Battalion Assistant Task Force Engineer in 2004. During his deployment, he sustained a Traumatic Brain Injury as a result of a complex IED attack. He has written and talked about his combat and post-deployment adjustment experiences, and found the process has played an important role in his recovery. As a volunteer at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center, he is currently working to establish a program to help other OEF/OIF veterans write about their experiences.

 
Janet M. Cromer

Janet M. Cromer, RN, MA, ATR, LMHC Psychiatric RN, licensed psychotherapist, and Registered Art Therapist with an MA in Expressive Therapies from Lesley University and author of Professor Cromer Learns to Read: A Couple’s New Life After Brain Injury. Workshop: Reflective Engagement: Creating Effective Partnerships with TBI Family Caregivers

Janet M. Cromer, RN, MA, ATR, LMHC is a psychiatric RN, licensed psychotherapist, and Registered Art Therapist with an MA in Expressive Therapies from Lesley University. Janet’s memoir Professor Cromer Learns to Read: A Couple’s New Life After Brain Injury is the recipient of a Solimene Award for Excellence in Medical Communication and a Neal Duane Award for Distinction from the American MedicalWriter’s Association—NE Chapter.

 

 

MK Czerwiec

MK Czerwiec, RN, MA Nurse, graphic artist, and graduate of Northwestern’s MA in Medical Humanities & Bioethics. Workshop: Graphic Witness: Comics, Drawing and Trauma

MK Czerwiec is a nurse, graphic artist, and graduate of Northwestern’s Masters in Medical Humanities & Bioethics. She is currently working on a graphic adaptation of her thesis project, an oral history of an inpatient AIDS unit. Her art can be seen on her website, www.comicnurse.com.

 

 

Bryan Doerries, Theater of War

Bryan DoerriesFounder, Theater of War Performance: Theater of War will perform on Friday afternoon.

Bryan Doerries is a New York-based writer, translator, director, and educator. He is the founder of Theater of War, a project that presents readings of ancient Greek plays to service members, veterans, caregivers and families as a catalyst for town hall discussions about the challenges faced by combat veterans today. Over the past year, Bryan has directed film and stage actors such as Paul Giamatti, Isiah Whitlock Jr., David Strathairn, Lili Taylor, Charles S. Dutton, Gloria Reuben, and Jeffrey Wright in readings of his translations of Sophocles’ Ajax and Philoctetes for military communities. In addition to his work in the theater, Bryan serves as program adviser for the nonprofit Alliance for Young Artists & Writers and lectures on his work at colleges and universities.

Read Bryan Doerries' op-ed in the Washington Post about his experience taking Theater of War performances to military bases.

Noel J. Genova

Noel J. Genova, MA, PA-C Clinical Physician Assistant at Mercy Primary Care, Portland, Maine and formerly on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Academy of Physicians Assistants (JAPPA) Workshop: Literature and Understanding Sources of Trauma

Noel Genova has been a clinical Physician Assistant for 30 years, working in a variety of settings, including primary care practices, an abortion clinic, occupational medicine, a drug and alcohol detox unit, and a clinic serving refugees and asylum seekers in inner city Birmingham, England. She has also taught evidence-based medicine, and has served on the editorial board of her national association’s official journal.

Noel was born, raised, and educated in Boston, completing Physician Assistant training at Northeastern University in 1980. After working in east Kentucky for 2 years, she moved to Maine with her husband, psychiatrist Paul Genova, where they raised 3 children. Her non-work interests include playing guitar, watching birds, hiking, knitting, and spending time with her adult children.

 
Jonna Goulding

Jonna Goulding, MD Family doctor and palliative care specialist, Gifford Primary Care and Gifford Medical Center, Randolph, Vermont. Workshop: How Wounded Healer Stories Help Us Heal

Jonna Goulding is a family doctor and palliative care specialist interested in using storytelling and other arts to help practitioners deepen their practice of caregiving to the dying. She was a banker, marketing and advertising executive, and hospice volunteer before attending to medical school. After graduating from McMaster Medical School in Ontario, she completed a rural family practice residency in Thunder Bay, Ontario. She now lives in central Vermont, where she practices medicine and music, listens to stories and tells some of her own, and writes.

 
Elizabeth Balsam Hart

Elizabeth Balsam Hart, MD Family physician with board certification in Geriatrics and Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Her clinical practice focuses on the care of people living in nursing homes, and for those living with dementia or nearing the end of life. Workshop: Reliving and Relieving Traumatic Suffering as Death Approaches

Elizabeth Balsam Hart is a family physician with board certification in Geriatrics and Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Her clinical practice focuses on the care of people living in nursing homes, and for those living with dementia or nearing the end of life. She participated in the early planning of the Maine Humanities Council’s Literature & Medicine program and served as a facilitator for groups in Maine for over 10 years, including the group at the VA Medical Center at Togus. A graduate of Harvard-Radcliffe Colleges and Dartmouth Medical School with a background in medical humanities and medical ethics, she completed residency and her geriatric fellowship at Maine-Dartmouth Family Practice Residency. She has recently completed a Practice Change Fellowship, a geriatric leadership program supported by the Atlantic Philanthropies and the John A Hartford Foundation. In a collaborative partnership with the Maine Hospice Council and the Maine Office of Elder Services she leads an advance care planning initiative “Cultivating Meaningful Conversations to Guide Care.”

 
Nellie Hermann

Nellie Hermann, MFA She teaches writing at Barnard College and in the Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University. Workshop: Working through Words: Narrative and Self-Care

Nellie Hermann is a graduate of Brown University and the M.F.A. program at Columbia. Her first novel, The Cure for Grief (Scribner), received national acclaim in Time Magazine, Elle, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, and other publications. Her short story “Can We Let the Baby Go?” won first prize in Glimmer Train’s 2008 “Family Matters” competition and was published in Winter, 2010. She teaches writing at Barnard College and in the Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University.

 

Phyllis Kaufman Producer, Theater of War Performance: Theater of War will perform on Friday afternoon.

Phyllis Kaufman is a New York-based producer and lawyer with an expertise in social impact-oriented entertainment that combines traditional and digital media. She is the producer of Theater of War, a project that presents readings of ancient Greek plays to service members, veterans, caregivers and families as a catalyst for town hall discussions about the challenges faced by combat veterans today. Ms. Kaufman’s interest in the power of traditional and digital media has also led her to careers as Artistic Director of the Philadelphia Festival of World Cinema, a producer of feature and documentary films, and, most recently, a partner in the media/entertainment practice group of a New York-based law firm. Ms. Kaufman also serves on the advisory boards of several nonprofit organizations.

Read about Theater of War's experiences of talking their performances to military bases in the Washington Post.

Thomas Lizotte

Thomas LizotteDirector of Marketing and Development at Mayo Regional Hospital in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine and longtime liaison for the Literature & Medicine program at his hospital. Pre-conference training: How to Start a Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health CareŽ Program at your Institution Training: Thursday

Thomas Lizotte has been Director of Marketing and Development at Mayo Regional Hospital in Dover-Foxcroft, Maine, since 1997, responsible for the hospital’s marketing, public relations and fundraising functions. He has been the hospital’s liaison for Literature & Medicine since 1998, when Mayo became the second hospital in the country to host the program.

Lizotte has been a member of the Maine Humanities Council’s Board of Directors since 2005, and is the Board’s incoming Chair. He has served the MHC as Vice Chair, Strategic Planning chair, Development Committee chair and representative on Maine's Cultural Affairs Council. He has been a Piscataquis County Commissioner since 2003, currently board chairman, and is also past chair of the Dover-Foxcroft Board of Selectmen.

A graduate of Colby College, Lizotte spent 22 years as a newspaper journalist with stints as sports editor and news editor of the Central Maine Morning Sentinel in Waterville, and as managing editor of the Piscataquis Observer in Dover-Foxcroft and Moosehead Messenger in Greenville.

Lizotte’s interest in public education has led to membership on the President’s Advisory Council at Eastern Maine Community College, and on the Board of Trustees of Foxcroft Academy. An avid reader, he is a member of the Executive Committee of the Thompson Free Library in Dover-Foxcroft.

A strong proponent of the need for economic development in rural Maine, Lizotte is vice chair of the Eastern Maine Development Corp. board, vice chair of the Penquis CAP board, past president of the Piscataquis County Economic Development Council, and secretary of the Pine Crest Development Corp.

David Loxterkampt

David Loxterkamp, MDFamily Physician in Belfast, Maine and author of A Measure of My Days. Workshop: Collateral Damage: The Hidden Cost of Caring for Others

David Loxterkamp is a family physician who lives and works in Belfast, Maine. He authored A Measure of My Days: The Journal of a Country Doctor (U Press of New England, 1997) and numerous articles for professional and lay publication. His other interests include running, gardening, and the history of his hometown.

Read articles by David Loxterkamp in JAMA ("Old Men and the Sea," JAMA Vol. 304 No. 1, July 7, 2010) and the Annals of Family Medicine (“The Old Duffers’ Club” Annals of Family Medicine 7:269-272, 2009).

 
Veneta Masson

Veneta Masson, RN, MA Author of Rehab at the Florida Avenue Grill, Ninth Street Notebook—Voice of a Nurse in the City, and Clinician’s Guide to the Soul. Workshop: Clinician’s Guide to Invisible Wounds: Seeing Inside our Patients and Ourselves

A nurse in practice for thirty-five years, twenty of them in primary health care, Veneta Masson was a founder, director and, for most of two decades, family nurse practitioner in a small, mom-and-pop clinic providing office and home care to an inner-city neighborhood in Washington, D.C. Two books came out of that experience: Ninth Street Notebook—Voice of a Nurse in the City contains short pieces about big issues in health care from her vantage point on the front lines of health care. Rehab at the Florida Avenue Grill is a poetry collection featuring narrative poems about events and people whose lives changed hers.

Though no longer in practice, Veneta continues to explore healing art. Her new poetry collection, Clinician’s Guide to the Soul, was published in 2008. She works with medical and nursing students taking courses in health care ethics at Georgetown University.

Veneta Masson was interviewed in our second edition of Synapse, Literature & Medicine’s e-zine. You can read it here.

Debjani Mukherjee

Debjani Mukherjee Director, Donnelley Ethics Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago; Assistant Professor, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation and Medical Humanities & Bioethics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Workshop: “Who Am I?” The Essence of Identity After Traumatic Brain Injury

Debjani Mukherjee is the Director of the Donnelley Ethics Program at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC) and an Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and of Medical Humanities and Bioethics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. Dr. Mukherjee is a licensed clinical psychologist with postdoctoral training in clinical medical ethics. Her research interests are in psychosocial adjustment to Traumatic Brain Injury, the cultural contexts of medical decisions, and ethical dilemmas posed by neurological impairments.

 

Alan Oakman US Navy, 1966-70 Workshop: From Ancient Greece to Baghdad and Beyond: Reading Homer with Combat Veterans

Alan Oakman (U.S. Navy, 1966-70) served as a medic in Vietnam 1969-70.

Tim O’Brien

Tim O’BrienAward-winning author of Going After Cacciato (National Book Award), In the Lake of the Woods (James Fenimore Cooper Prize for Best Historical Fiction), and The Things They Carried (finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award, winner of the Prix du Meilleur Livre Étranger). Speaking: Saturday at lunch

Tim O’Brien has been hailed as “the best American writer of his generation” (San Francisco Examiner). A Vietnam veteran, he is the author of eight books. He received the National Book Award in Fiction in 1979 for his novel Going After Cacciato. In 2005 The Things They Carried was named by The New York Times as one of the twenty best books of the last quarter century. It received the Chicago Tribune Heartland Award in fiction and was a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. The French edition of The Things They Carried received the prestigious Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger, and the title story was selected by John Updike for inclusion in The Best American Short Stories of the Century. In the Lake of the Woods, published in 1994, was chosen by Time magazine as the best novel of that year. The book also received the James Fenimore Cooper Prize from the Society of American Historians and was selected as one of the ten best books of the year by The New York Times. Tim O’Brien’s other works include If I Die in a Combat Zone, Northern Lights, Tomcat in Love and July, July. His short fiction, which received the National Magazine Award, has appeared in numerous journals, including The New Yorker, Atlantic, Esquire, Playboy, and Harper’s.

Read more about Tim O’Brien and hear him speak: “Remembering War,” Talk of the Nation (National Public Radio; 05-26-03); the Leonard Lopate Show, WNYC (Monday, March 22, 2010) discussing The Things They Carried on the twentieth anniversary of its publication; The New York Times (reviews), Tim O’Brien’s 1994 essay from The New York Time’s Magazine “The Vietnam In Me” and “How to Tell a War Story“, from The Things They Carried.

 

Father Joseph O’Keeffe Chaplain, Veterans Administration Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont Workshop: From Ancient Greece to Baghdad and Beyond: Reading Homer with Combat Veterans

Father Joseph O’Keeffe served as a military chaplain (13 years reserves; 26 plus years active duty, with tours in Korea, Panama, and Somalia), and he continues to provide pastoral counseling at the White River Junction, VT., VA.

Bob Patrick

Robert W. “Bob” Patrick, Colonel, US Army (ret.)Director, Veterans History Project, American Folklife Center, Library of Congress Workshop: Veterans’ Stories: Trauma and the Experience of War

Bob Patrick has been the director of the Veterans History Project at the Library of Congress since 2006. VHP is a congressionally mandated effort to collect and preserve the wartime memories of America’s veterans. Mr. Patrick manages all aspects of the Project and directs the building of a nationwide network of volunteer interviewers and organizations. He serves as the project’s chief spokesperson and has appeared across the country on its behalf. Mr. Patrick retired from the US Army as a Colonel in 1999; he spent more than five years in a leadership role with the National World War II Memorial Project at the American Battle Monuments Commission. He directed the Memorial’s historic dedication on May 29, 2004.

Laurie Quinn

Laurie Quinn, PhD Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at Granite State College Pre-conference training: How to Start a Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health Care® Program at your Institution Training: Thursday

Laurie Quinn is Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at Granite State College, the University System of New Hampshire’s college for working adults. Laurie teaches British literature, women’s literature, writing, and various other courses as a member of the college’s adjunct faculty. She is committed to the public humanities and regularly facilitates literature groups on various topics around northern New England. She also serves on the College Board’s English Literature Examination Committee and as an Institutional Representative to New Hampshire Women in Higher Education Leadership. A facilitator in the Maine Humanities Council’s Literature & Medicine program for seven years and a Literature and Medicine Institute faculty member in 2006 and 2008, Laurie directed the New Hampshire Humanities Council’s health care and humanities initiatives when serving as Senior Program Director there. Her doctorate is in English literature, and she earned her M.A. and B.A. from Boston College. In addition to literature and medicine, Dr. Quinn’s interests include social class issues in and around literature, feminist literary traditions, modern British literature, and contemporary British and American poetry. She lives in Dover, NH with her husband and their son.

Timothy J. Richardson

Timothy J. Richardson Chief of Staff of the VA Medical Center, Togus, Maine Pre-conference training: How to Start a Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health Care® Program at your Institution Training: Thursday

Timothy J. Richardson was appointed Chief of Staff of the VA Medical Center, Togus in September 2000 with the challenge of improving access to primary and specialty medical care services for veterans in Maine. Additionally, he is working to further improve the Palliative and End-of-Life care provided to Maine veterans. Togus operates a medical center offering a broad range of primary and specialized services in Medicine, Surgery, Mental Health, and Geriatrics and Extended Care, and five community-based clinics offering Primary Care services to veterans in areas remote from the medical center. Dr. Richardson is a native of Bethany, Connecticut. He completed his pre-medical studies at Colby College in Waterville, Maine where he received a BA degree in Biology and English. He received his M.D. degree from Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia where he was elected a member of the AOA Medical Honor Society. Prior to his VA appointment, he was in private practice in Internal Medicine in Waterville, Maine and served as Assistant Director of the Dialysis Unit at Mid-Maine Medical Center. Dr. Richardson joined the VA in 1986 as a staff physician in Ambulatory Care at Togus and was the Chief of Geriatrics and Extended Care from 1991 until he assumed the Chief of Staff position. He is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine with additional certification in Geriatric Medicine. He has been an active participant and advocate for the Literature & Medicine group at Togus VAMC, and is an advisor for the effort to involve Literature & Medicine program in VA hospitals across the country.

Jonathan Shay

Jonathan Shay, MD, PhDStaff Psychiatrist, Department of Veteran Affairs Outpatient Clinic Boston, MA (retired); MacArthur Fellow (2007); author of Achilles in Vietnam and Odysseus in America. Speaking: Friday morning

Jonathan Shay, MD, PhD is a clinical psychiatrist whose treatment of combat trauma suffered by Vietnam veterans combined with his critical and imaginative interpretations of the ancient accounts of battle described in Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey are deepening our understanding of the effects of warfare on the individual. His book, Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma and the Undoing of Character (1994), draws parallels between the depiction of the epic warrior-hero Achilles and the experiences of individual veterans whom he treated at a Boston-area Veterans Affairs’ Outpatient Clinic. In Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming (2002), using Odysseus as metaphor, Shay focuses on the veteran’s experience upon returning from war and highlights the role of military policy in promoting the mental and physical safety of soldiers. A passionate advocate for veterans and committed to minimizing future psychological trauma, Shay strives for structural reform of the ways the U.S. armed forces are organized, trained, and counseled.

Respected by humanists and military leaders alike, Shay brings into stark relief the emotional problems faced by military combatants and veterans, ancient and modern. In 2007, he was awarded a MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” for his work with veterans.

Read more about Dr. Shay and hear him speak: “Dr. Jonathan Shay on Returning Veterans and Combat Trauma” (audio interview) by Deborah Sontag and Amy O’Leary, The New York Times (1-13-08); Profile from the MacAuthur Foundation (video); “Psychiatrist Who Counsels Vets Wins Genius Grant” (audio interview) by Joseph Shapiro, National Public Radio (9-22-07); “SCIENTIST AT WORK—Jonathan Shay; Exploring Combat and the Psyche, Beginning With Homer” by David Berreby, The New York Times (2-11-03).

Hugh Silk

Hugh Silk, MD, FAAFP Family physician and Education Director at Hahnemann Family Health Center in Worcester, MA Workshop: Collateral Damage: The Hidden Cost of Caring for Others

Hugh Silk, MD, FAAFP, is a family physician and Education Director at Hahnemann Family Health Center/UMASS Family Medicine Residency in Worcester, MA and is Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He graduated from McMaster Medical School in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada and did his residency at University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency in Worcester. Hugh moderates a weekly list serve of clinical success stories written by family doctors and learners. He runs the humanities in medicine workshops for the residents, has used film in his teaching of medical students, and is an active member of the medical school's humanities in medicine committee. He has also taught undergraduates about literature and social reflection at Harvard University with Robert Coles.

Laura Simms

Laura Simms Storyteller Workshops: THE STORIES WE TELL: Medicine for the Heart
and AND WE FLEW...Storytelling and the Medicine of Meaning

Laura Simms is one of the best known and respected storytellers in the world today, training others in the fields of healing, education, the environment and peacemaking. She is affiliated with Naropa University, Columbia University and Rutgers University. She works with NGOS including Mercy Corps, IMC, and Search for Common Ground.

Learn much more about Laura Simms and her work.

 

Lizz Sinclair

Lizz Sinclair Program Officer for the Maine Humanities Council since 1999 Pre-conference training: How to Start a Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health Care® Program at your Institution Training: Thursday

Lizz Sinclair has been a Program Officer for the Maine Humanities Council since 1999, directing the Let’s Talk About It program for libraries and organizing Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health CareŽ. With Literature & Medicine she works closely with healthcare professionals, scholars and colleagues at other humanities councils in her role as a trainer and mentor for the program in Maine and nationally. Lizz is the editor of Synapse, Literature & Medicine’s e-zine and can be found painting when not at the Council.

Listen to Lizz Sinclair talk about the Literature & Medicine program in an interview with Tom Porter of Maine Public Broadcasting.

Maura Spiegel

Maura Spiegel, PhD Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University and Barnard College; Core Faculty in the Program for Narrative Medicine and the Master of Science program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons; former co-editor of the journal Literature and Medicine Workshops: Films and Feelings: Beyond Spectacle to Process and Reflection
and Working through Words: Narrative and Self-Care

Maura Spiegel has a joint appointment at Columbia University and Barnard College where she teaches literature, film and American Studies. A member of the Core Faculty in the Program for Narrative Medicine at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, she teaches film to second-year medical students, as well as graduate students in the Master of Science Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia. Recently she has been running a writing workshop for the staff of the NYU/Bellevue Program for Survivor’s of Torture. She is the co-author of The Grim Reader: Writings on Death, Dying and Living On (Anchor/Doubleday); she has recently edited new editions of Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle and Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan of the Apes for the Barnes & Noble Classics Series. With Rita Charon, MD, PhD, she co-edited the journal Literature and Medicine for seven years, has written for The New York Times, and has published essays on many topics. She is currently writing a book about the films of Sidney Lumet.

Patricia Stanley

Patricia Stanley, MA, MBA Core faculty in the Program for Narrative Medicine and clinical coordinator of the Masters in Narrative Medicine at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons Workshop: Working through Words: Narrative and Self-Care

Patricia Stanley has worked with Rita Charon in the Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons since 2003 and is currently on the core faculty team. At Columbia University Medical Center she has facilitated narrative medicine workshops for the pediatric oncology staff and conducts ongoing narrative writing workshops for oncology outpatients, clinicians and family caregivers. Pat teaches in the Narrative Medicine workshops offered by the Program in Narrative Medicine for health and other professionals from around the world and has taught fourth year medical students about “illness narratives” in the narrative medicine immersion month at Columbia. She is core faculty and clinical coordinator of the Masters in Narrative Medicine which was launched last fall at Columbia. She also has extensive experience in oral history, introducing narrative and oral history through a video story project for secondary school student/patients, staff and families of the Mt. Pleasant/Blythedale UFSD (a school for children with serious chronic illness and disability), and conducting oral history interviews with cancer patients at the Dickstein Cancer Center, White Plains, NY. Her’s publications include “Pediatric Narrative Oncology: Inter-Professional Training to Promote Empathy, Build Teams and Prevent Burnout,” co-authored with Stephen A. Sands and Rita Charon in The Journal of Supportive Oncology (2008); “The Female Voice in Illness: An Antidote to Alienation, A Call for Connection” in Stories of Illness and Healing: Women Write Their Bodies, edited by Sayantani Das Gupta and Marsha Hurst (2007); and “The Patient’s Voice: A Cry in Solitude or a Call for Community,” in Literature and Medicine (2004). She serves on numerous boards of educational and health care organizations, particularly for children. She holds a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Pennsylvania, an MBA with Distinction in finance from Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, and a masters in Health Advocacy from Sarah Lawrence College.

Roberta Stewart

Roberta Stewart, PhD Associate Professor of Classics, Dartmouth College Workshop: From Ancient Greece to Baghdad and Beyond: Reading Homer with Combat Veterans

Roberta Stewart teaches Roman history, Latin, and Greek at Dartmouth College. She has published articles on Roman history, religion, and numismatics, and her first book (Public Office in Early Rome: Ritual Definitions and Political Practice) treated the early development of Roman government. Her current book project explores the system of chattel slavery in Republican Rome and the experience of slaves who survived within a system of domination.

 

Gala True

Jennifer “Gala” True, PhD Associate Investigator, Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Philadelphia VA Medical Center Workshop: Veterans’ Stories: Trauma and the Experience of War

Gala True is a medical anthropologist and folklorist whose research focuses on the role of narrative and ethnography to reduce barriers to care and improve post-deployment health outcomes for combat veterans. She recently completed an intervention study investigating the use of Life Story interviews to decrease social anxiety and PTSD symptoms for veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Her current work involves using visual images and first-person narratives to sensitize VA clinicians to deployment and post-deployment experiences and perspectives of returning combat veterans, and to promote patient-centered care at the VA.

Theater of War

Theater of War Presentation: Special performance and discussion of Sophocles’ Ajax and Philoctetes. Bryan Doerries, Founder and Director; Phyllis Kaufman, Producer. Performance Friday afternoon

Since 2008, Theater of War has presented readings of Sophocles’ Ajax and Philoctetes to military communities across the United States. These ancient plays timelessly and universally depict the psychological and physical wounds inflicted upon warriors by war. By presenting these plays to military audiences, Theater of War hopes to de-stigmatize psychological injury and open a safe space for dialogue about the challenges faced by service members, veterans, and their caregivers and families.

Ajax tells the story of a fierce warrior who slips into a depression near the end of The Trojan War, attempts to murder his commanding officers, fails, and takes his own life. It is also the story of how his wife and troops attempt to intervene before it’s too late. Philoctetes is a psychologically complex tragedy about a famous Greek warrior who is marooned on a deserted island by his army after contracting a horrifying and debilitating illness.

Learn more about Theater of War at their website, which features articles about ToW that have appeared in: PBS Newshour, Stars & Stripes, Psychiatric News, The New York Times, The US Department of Defense, Armed Forces Press Service, The Atlantic, The Washignton Times, along with additional information.

Read about Theater of War’s experiences of talking their performances to military bases in the Washington Post.

Kerryellen Vroman

Kerryellen Vroman, PhD Faculty member in the College of Health and Human Services at the University of New Hampshire Workshop: Towards Knowing: Can We Teach and Develop the Capacity for Empathy?

Kerryellen Vroman is faculty member in the College of Health and Human Services at the University of New Hampshire. She has a PhD in health psychology and her professional education is in occupational therapy. Her research focuses on the psychosocial factors, namely the dispositional characteristics and attitudes of healthcare practitioners and patients that influence health outcomes and adaptation to disability.